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Antonin Artaud, Stephen Barber (Hg.): Artaud 1937 Apocalypse

Antonin Artaud, Stephen Barber (Hg.)

Artaud 1937 Apocalypse
Letters from Ireland

Übersetzt von Stephen Barber

Mit einem Nachwort von Stephen Barber

Broschur, 80 Seiten

PDF, 80 Seiten

The Letters from Ireland

After publishing a manifesto prophecy about the catastrophic immediate-future entitled The New Revelations of Being, Antonin Artaud abruptly left Paris and travelled to Ireland, remaining there for six weeks and existing without money. On his return, he spent nine years in lunatic asylums, including the entire span of the Second World War. During that journey to Ireland—on which he accumulated signs of his forthcoming apocalypse, and planned his own role in it as ‘THE REVEALED ONE’—he wrote letters to friends in Paris.

Antonin Artaud’s 1937 apocalyptic journey to Ireland and his writings from that journey form an extraordinary moment of accumulating disintegration and tenacious creativity in his work.

With an afterword and notes by the book’s translator/editor Stephen Barber.

Inhalt
  • 7–16

    The New Revelations of Being, 1937

  • 17–68

    Letters from Ireland, 1937

  • 69–80

    Afterword

  • Irland
  • Literaturgeschichte
  • Schreiben
  • Tod
  • Wahnsinn
  • Briefe

Meine Sprache
Deutsch

Aktuell ausgewählte Inhalte
Deutsch, Englisch, Französisch

Antonin Artaud

Antonin Artaud

(1896–1948) is one of the seminal figures of twentieth century writing, art and sound experimentation, known especially for his work with the Surrealist movement, his performance theories, his asylum incarcerations, and his artworks which have been exhibited in major exhibitions, at New York’s MOMA and many other art-museums.

Stephen Barber

ist Autor von 25 Büchern, darunter sieben Romane. Kürzlich erschienen: White Noise Ballrooms und The Projectionists. Eadweard Muybridge and the Future Projections of the Moving Image. Seine Bücher wurden vielfach ausgezeichnet und in diverse Sprachen übersetzt. The Independent newspaper (London) nannte ihn »den gefährlichsten Mann Europas«.
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